VANISHING BOUNDARIES

Mia Bergeron Sergio Lopez, September 2014


September 5, 5:00 - 8:00 pm


Artist(s):

Mia Bergeron

Sergio Lopez

About the Exhibit

For me, the works in “Vanishing Boundaries” are an amalgamation of life lessons I’ve learned in the …

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This September 5 to 25, Robert Lange Studios in Charleston, South Carolina, will hold a two-artist exhibit for Mia Bergeron and Sergio Lopez. Titled Vanishing Boundaries, this show marks the first time the pair will display their work together. Both artists paint captivating and distinctive figures, with Bergeron taking on portraiture and Lopez focusing on the entire being.

 

“For me, the works in Vanishing Boundaries are an amalgamation of life lessons I’ve learned in the past year,” says Bergeron. “I have found, to my own detriment, I can easily go into black-white, wrong-right thinking. Ironically, this year has been much richer since I have embraced the middle ‘grays’ of my life…In turn, my work has become more focused on these middle areas, these lost passages, the ‘gray areas,’ and a lot more about breaking those linear boundaries both technically and conceptually.” Another idea that Bergeron plays with in these paintings is how to show the mood surrounding the person as depicted in When You Get There. “I deeply believe that we are linked to the people, places and things around us, and in this piece I wanted to take a step back from looking solely at his face and allow for study of the atmosphere in front of him as well,” she explains. This year Bergeron also has added a new tool to her arsenal—a palette knife. “I start the painting with the palette knife. It’s not as proficient as a brush; it allows me to see in a broad way without overly drawing anything,” she explains. “I let that layer dry and sand it and then I come back in with a brush and refine the pieces. The palette knife makes it where you’re seeing everything at once at the beginning rather than working on one area and working the way out.”

 

Recognized for his intricate blending of background and subject, Lopez is exploring a new visual concept in this upcoming exhibit as demonstrated in the painting All Birds Must Have Wings. “It’s just the visual idea of the female outdoors modeling with the peacock cape. It isn’t so much about the figures blending in and out with the background; although I’m doing a little bit of design where I’m leaving out parts of the background,” he explains. This painting also brings to fruition another idea that Lopez has been contemplating. “I’ve been wrestling with the idea that painting has to have a deep underlying meaning behind the piece to be considered ‘high art.’ I’m vehemently opposed to the idea that a painting can’t be ‘pretty’ and taken seriously at the same time,” says Lopez. “I feel like if a painting is composed well, drawn and painted well, with interesting surface quality, appealing color/value, etc., it can be admired without some sort of didactic message or cryptic idea behind it. The peacock is known to be a symbol of beauty for its own sake. So this series is a visual representation of the idea.” 

Sergio says about the body of work:

 

About working with Mia:

I have enjoyed seeing Mia’s work and how it continually improves steadily for years. Her work was a big reason that I came to the Robert Lange Studios gallery. Her work has a captivating mood, she is bold yet sensitive with her technique, and her concepts make you search for the soul within her pieces. I am very much looking forward to meeting her in person because I can tell she is a deep, intelligent, and gentle painter based on the nature of her paintings alone. I am beyond flattered to be considered in the same caliber as Mia and and am so excited to be showing alongside her this autumn.

 

About the painting, “All Birds Must Have Wings”:

I’ve been wrestling with the idea that painting has to have a deep underlying meaning behind the piece to be considered “high art.” I’m vehemently opposed to the idea that a painting can’t be “pretty” and taken seriously at the same time. I feel like if a painting is composed well, drawn and painted well, with interesting surface quality, appealing color/value etc. it can be admired without some sort of didactic message or cryptic idea behind it. The peacock is known to be a symbol of beauty for its own sake. So this series is a visual representation of the idea.

 

 

 

Mia says the following about the body of work:

 

About Working with Sergio:

When the Langes first let me know about potentially showing with Sergio, I was thrilled at the opportunity to exhibit with a painter I had respected for many years previously. What I am drawn to about Sergio’s work is his immense capacity to unite seemingly opposed ideas. In one sense, he is an accomplished figure painter, and I am constantly drawn to his choice of models and poses. In another sense, he is able to bring abstract patterns and landscapes into his figurative ideas and make a cohesive and harmonious image that is both rich and exciting. I am very inspired by this visual juxtaposition, and it is something that both intrigues me in my own work, and makes me learn from his.

 

About the exhibit:

For me, the works in “Vanishing Boundaries” are an amalgamation of life lessons I’ve learned in the past year. I’ve always been a planner, someone who worries, someone who compares. One might say I’ve been a linear achiever. The past year I have spent time investigating my personal beliefs of the world and myself. I have found to my own detriment I can easily go into black/white, wrong/right thinking. Ironically, this year has been much richer since I have embraced the middle “grays” of my life…. the places of doubt, vulnerability, and indecision. In turn, my work has become more focused on these middle areas, these lost passages, the “gray areas”, and a lot more about breaking those linear boundaries, both technically and conceptually. I’ve also fallen in love with using a palette knife as a tool in painting….there is something about its inability to overdraw that I have found to really concur with my ideas at the moment.

Because I have been using a different tool, I have been working a lot more with layers in a painting. Most of the paintings presented in this exhibit have been painted, sanded, and scraped dozens of times until I find that balance of what is said and what is left to be found.

 

About the piece “When you get there” :

Mood is a dominant theme in my work. In “When You Get There”, I wanted to show not only the person staring back at me, but also to bring into cognizance the space between the viewer and the subject. In a way, it is a portrait about both the subject and the conditions surrounding the subject. I feel like I can almost see the air in front of him. I deeply believe that we are linked to the people, places, and things around us, and in this piece I wanted to take a step back from looking solely at his face, and allow for study of the atmosphere in front of him as well.

Exhibit Images


Opening Night

ROBERT LANGE STUDIOS

TWO QUEEN ST, CHARLESTON

Robert Lange Studios
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